Interesting stuff from around the web 2008-12-06

Online Identity just got really interesting and really competitive… lets hope the open stack wins not the proprietary

Biggest Battle Yet For Social Networks: You, Your Identity And Your Data On The Open Web
Facebook makes their big press push for their ‘Facebook Connect‘ service, MySpace have ‘Data Availability‘ and Google ‘Friend Connect‘. Sites that use these services make life a bit easier for them, but the real value goes to the social networks. These services make users begin to think about their identity in terms of their MySpace profile, or Facebook login as they use it to sign into their favorite services. That makes it even more likely the users will maintain their profiles on those services, add friends, etc. The real risk with Facebook is the proprietary login and data sharing standards, Myspace is so much better with its use of open standards including OpenID and their willingness to work with Google (Facebook have prohibited Google from getting in the middle).

Crime fighting team by ittybittiesforyou. Some rights reserved.
Crime fighting team by ittybittiesforyou. Some rights reserved.

David Recordon considers “Getting OpenID Into the Browser” [O’Reilly Radar]
Google Chrome did a smart thing: Less. They unified the search box and address bar, since that’s what people do anyway. That gives us back precious pixels for the only thing that’s as important to an average web user as where they’re going: Who they are. Identity belongs in the browser.

Some interesting thoughts on near future of the web

User Styling – bit of custom css and you can get the site to look the way you want [24 ways via @fantasticlife]
Override a publishers styling, remove ads whatever you like. It’s interesting to consider the implications of this if, as @fantasticlife suggests, this goes more mainstream since it will change the role of design – the publisher gives you the data you presented as you want it.

Going Hyper-Local – Location Based Internet [redcatco.com]
Fire Eagle, Flickr, Twitter, Dopplr, BrightKite and many more help you tell the web about where you are – and then find people near you.

The enterprise is about control and the web is about emergence but for how long? [O’Reilly Radar]
I suspect it’s more likely the result of large scale system dynamics, where the culture of control follows from other constraints. If multiverse advocates are right and there are infinite parallel universes, I bet most of them have IT enterprises just like ours; at least in those shards that have similar corporate IT boundary conditions. Once you have GAAP, Sarbox, domain-specific regulation like HIPAA, quarterly expectations from “The Street,” decades of MIS legacy, and the talent acquisition realities that mature companies in mature industries face, the strange attractors in the system will pull most of those shards to roughly the same place. In other words, the IT enterprise is about control because large businesses in mature industries are about control. On the other hand, the web is about emergence because in this time, place, and with this technology discontinuity, emergence is the low energy state.

The Future of Ephemeral Conversation [Schneier on Security]
The Internet is the greatest generation gap since rock and roll. We’re now witnessing one aspect of that generation gap: the younger generation chats digitally, and the older generation treats those chats as written correspondence. Until our CEOs blog, our Congressmen Twitter, and our world leaders send each other LOLcats – until we have a Presidential election where both candidates have a complete history on social networking sites from before they were teenagers– we aren’t fully an information age society.

Some photo stuff

LIFE photo archive hosted by Google
Search millions of photographs from the LIFE photo archive, stretching from the 1750s to today. Most were never published and are now available for the first time through the joint work of LIFE and Google.

Find Flickr photos my colour [Multicolr Search Lab]
They are extracting the colours from 10 million of the most “interesting” Creative Commons images on Flickr and then use “visual similarity technology” so you can navigate the collection by colour.

Some BBC stuff

BBC Programmes iPhone webapp experiment [Whomwah.com]
Another nice bit of hacking from Duncan – browse BBC TV and Radio schedules on your iPhone, the iPhone way – living further out of London with longer train journeys has improved his hacking output.

BBC builders: Tom Scott, and the team behind /programmes and /music [guardian.co.uk]
That’s me! Jemima Kiss has started interviewing folk at the BBC who are helping to build projects that people don’t hear about. She started with me, which was jolly nice.

Facebook: new social network site; same old walled garden

Last year the buzz was around MySpace now its Facebook and before that Friends Reunited and Linkedin. I have to confess that I’ve never really grokked these services – I’ve played around with them a bit – but generally never really got that much out of them. Preferring to stick with email, IM, Flickr, del.icio.us and my blog.

Trends in Facebook, MySpace, Friends Reunited and Linkedin

The problem I’ve always faced with community sites, such as LinkedIn or Facebook, is that I’m never sure I want to maintain yet another online presence. I know that they provide tools to help bootstrap the site with data about your group of friends (importing contacts from your email account etc.) but there’s more to it than that. And in the back of my mind I know that all too soon there will be a new site out there doing more or less the same thing but with a twist that grabs everyone’s attention. And the reason this is a problem is, as Steve Rubel points outs, because they are walled gardens.

Despite the age of openness we live in, Facebook is becoming the world’s largest, and perhaps most successful, walled garden that exists today…

The problem, however, lies in this fact – Facebook gives nothing back to the broader web. A lot of stuff goes in, but nothing comes out. What happens in Facebook, stays in Facebook. As Robert Scoble noted, it’s almost completely invisible to Google. You can share only a limited amount of data on your public page – as he has here. That’s fine for many users, but not all.”

Walled gardens create barriers to getting information in and out of their system. This means that I know that I will need to go to extra effort to seed the site with information about me and my network; maintain duplicate information between different gardens as well as in the wild; and have difficultly getting data out and into something else. Walled gardens will always eventually die because they require that extra bit of effort, both from their community and, more widely, the developer community. As Jason Kottke notes like AOL before them Facebook’s walled garden approach places additional strain on the development community.

What happens when Flickr and LinkedIn and Google and Microsoft and MySpace and YouTube and MetaFilter and Vimeo and Last.fm launch their platforms that you need to develop apps for in some proprietary language that’s different for each platform? That gets expensive, time-consuming, and irritating. It’s difficult enough to develop for OS X, Windows, and Linux simultaneously… imagine if you had 30 different platforms to develop for.”

[what’s needed is]…Facebook inside-out, so that instead of custom applications running on a platform in a walled garden, applications run on the internet, out in the open, and people can tie their social network into it if they want, with privacy controls, access levels, and alter-egos galore.”

In other words we already have the platform – its the internet, in its raw, wild, untended form. And rather than trying to build walls around bits of it we should keep our content in the open, in applications such as Flickr, WordPress (other blogging software is also available) and email. But tie it all together into communities with technologies such as OpenID the “open, decentralized, free framework for user-centric digital identity” and Friend of a Friend (a project aimed at creating a Web of machine-readable pages describing people, the links between them and the things they create and do).

Indeed this approach is similar to that adopted in Plaxo 3.0 which now runs as a web service removing all reliance on Outlook. Plaxo now provides a synchronization and brokerage service between applications (e.g. Outlook or Apple’s Address Book) and services (AOL, Google) – your data is no longer within a walled garden but you do have access control over who can access your data.

Facebook is an amazing success – but like all walled gardens will eventually either die or be forced to open its garden gate and let the rest of the internet in (for example, let me replace the Facebook’s status application with Twitter, or Photos with Flickr). And in the meantime I’m happy to stick with my existing online presence.