Interesting stuff from around the web 2009-02-04

Hippos are more closely related to their whale cousins than they (hippos) are to anything else
Hippos are more closely related to their whale cousins than they (hippos) are to anything else

Tree of Life – evolution interactive – Darwin 200 – Wellcome Trust
Want to know the concestor of two species then this is for you. And they have obviously spent time on the visual and interaction design and it’s great they have released it under a Creative Commons license. But, but because they haven’t provided URLs for each of the taxa it’s lost to the web, which is such a shame.

Google Latitude – see where you friends are in realtime [Google]
A service for sharing (primarily via your mobile phone) your location with friends and family and as such it’s similar to BrightKite and FireEagle. If Google integrate this into existing services, that is it becomes a service sat behind Google search and maps, then this could be a bit of a killer if only because that’s where people’s attention is. That said FireEagle is a generative location exchanging service.

How Twitter Was Born [140 Characters]
Interesting read about the birth and early days of Twitter.

Visualising our SVN commit history [whomwah]
Deeply cool.

Listen to Yourself [xkcd]
YouTube comments are a mess — this could the be answer, so might making the site about people and their videos rather than videos with some comments.

Interesting stuff from around the web 2008-10-06

The map is scaled to the number of radios per capita. The most radios per person are in Norway - at more than 3 per person.
The map is scaled to the number of radios in each territory. The most radios per person are in Norway - at more than 3 per person.

Lots and lots of clouds

Stephen Fry explains the principles of cloud computing and recommends a few services
Clever man Stephen Fry, perhaps he could write a piece on OpenID next.

Richard Stallman on Cloud Computing: “Stupidity” [autonomo.us]
“I’m very supportive of [Stallman’s] concern about cloud computing, and I agree that it’s something that the Free Software and Free Culture communities need to address. But in rejecting all network computing, I think RMS has thrown out the baby with the bathwater.”

Can’t Open Your E-Mailbox? Good Luck [NYTimes.com]
Amidst all the hype around cloud computing, The New York Times points out that if Google locks down your Gmail login for whatever reason (like someone tried the wrong password too many times), you’re basically screwed.

Some lovely visualisations, one odd one

Worldmapper: The world as you’ve never seen it before
Interesting collection of maps, where territories are re-sized on each map according to the subject of interest. There are now nearly 600 maps.

AirTraffic Worldwide [YouTube]
A map of the world showing a simulation of all of the air traffic in a 24-hour period

Flickr Panda – strange, very strange
Panda vomiting photos – why the Panda? Who knows. Something to do with this.

Height – the observable universe from top to bottom [xkcd]
I don’t normally link to xkcd because, to be honest, I would simply be linking to every addition. But this one is particularly good.

Listen to TimBL: Link your Data, give it context

Is Linking to Yourself the Future of the Web? [O’Reilly Radar]
“Follow Jay’s link and you come to a story that indeed doesn’t have any outbound links, except to other Times stories. Now, I understand the value of linking to other articles on your own site — everyone does it — but to do so exclusively is a small tear in the fabric of the web, a small tear that will grow much larger if it remains unchecked.”

…and listen to Martin: don’t fall for BDUF

‘Requirement’ is inherently waterfallish. Agile methods violate this underlying assumption by intending to discover the ‘requirements’ during construction and after delivery. [martinfowler.com]
Everyone knows how big the difference is between what people say they want and what people actually need and use. By watching what people actually do with your application, you can find out what actually happens with the software – which can give you much more direct information than other sources. As a result I think more teams should consider adding this approach to their toolkit.

Interesting stuff from around the web 2008-09-21

Eadward Muybridge’s 1878 investigation into whether horses’ feet were actually all off the ground at once during a trot.
Eadward Muybridge’s 1878 investigation into whether horses’ feet were actually all off the ground at once during a trot.

Born To Run – Human Evolution [DISCOVER Magazine]
Biomechanical research reveals a surprising key to the survival of our species: Humans are built to outrun nearly every other animal on the planet over long distances.

Prisoner’s Dilemma Visualisation [James Alliban]
Nice visualisation of the Prisoner’s Dilemma (a classic example of game theory) using Processing.

More Google news

Google Visualization API [Google Code]
The Google Visualization API lets you access multiple sources of structured data that you can display, choosing from a large selection of visualizations.

GAudi – Google’s new audio index [Official Google Blog]
It’s currently in Google Labs and is restricted to content from political sources but it still looks interesting. In addition to being able to search for terms you can also jump directly to the point in the video where the keyword is mentioned.

The social web: All about the small stuff [Official Google Blog]
The promise of the social web is about making it easy to share the small stuff – to make it effortless and rebuild that feeling of connectedness that comes from knowing the details.

More background on Matt’s hack: streaming content to iTunes

Things to do with /programmes #431: iTunes! [BBC Radio Labs]
Matt’s write up of his work on streaming iPlayer content through iTunes.

Very surprised the blog sphere hasn’t picked up on the implications of this hack but there you go.