Rich Snippets

As everyone knows last night Google announced that they are now supporting RDFa and microformats to add ‘Rich Snippets’ to their search results page.

Rich Snippets give users convenient summary information about their search results at a glance. We are currently supporting data about reviews and people. When searching for a product or service, users can easily see reviews and ratings, and when searching for a person, they’ll get help distinguishing between people with the same name…

To display Rich Snippets, Google looks for markup formats (microformats and RDFa) that you can easily add to your own web pages.

That’s good right? Google gets a higher click through rate because, as their user testing shows, the more useful and relevant information people see from a results page, the more likely they are to click through; sites that support these technologies make their content more discoverable and everyone else gets to what they need more easily. Brilliant, and to make life even better because Google have adopted RDFa and microformats

…you not only make your structured data available for Google’s search results, but also for any service or tool that supports the same standard. As structured data becomes more widespread on the web, we expect to find many new applications for it, and we’re excited about the possibilities.

Those Google guys, they really don’t do evil. Well actually no, not so much. Actually Google are being a little bit evil here.

Doctor Evil
Doctor Evil

Here’s the problem. When Google went and implemented RDFa support they adopted the syntax but decided not to adopt the vocabularies – they went and reinvented their own. And as Ian points out it’s the vocabularies that matters. What Google decided to do is little support those properties and classes defined at data-vocabulary.org rather than supporting the existing ontologies such as: FOAF, vCard and vocab.org/review.

Now in some ways this doesn’t matter too much, after all it’s easy enough to do this sort of thing:

rel=”foaf:name google:name”

And Google do need to make Rich Snippets work on their search results, they need to control which vocabularies to support so that webmaster know what to do and so they can render the data appropriatley. But by starting off with a somewhat broken vocabulary they are providing a pretty big incentive to Web Masters to implement a broken version of RDFa. And they will implement the broken version because Google Juice is so important to the success of their site.

Google have taken an open standard and inserted a slug of proprietary NIH into it and that’s a shame, they could have done so much better. Indeed they could have supported RDFa as well as they support microformats.

Perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised, Google are a commercial operation – by adopting RDFa they get a healthy dose of “Google and the Semantic Web” press coverage while at the same time making their search results that bit better. And lets be honest the semweb community hasn’t done a great job at getting those vocabularies out and into the mainstream so Google’s decision won’t hurt it’s bottom line. Just don’t be fooled this isn’t Google supporting RDFa, it’s Google adding Rich Snippets.

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