The mobile computing cloud needs OAuth

As Paul Miller notes Cloud Computing is everywhere – we are pushing more and more data and services into the cloud. Particularly when accessed from mobile devices this creates an incredibly powerful and useful user experience. I love it. The way that I can access all sorts of services from my iPhone means that an already wonderful appliance becomes way more powerful. But not all is well in the land of mobile-cloud computing; a nasty anti-pattern is developing. Thankfully there is a solution and it’s OAuth.

"Mobile phone Zombies" by Edward B. Used under licence.
"Mobile phone Zombies" by Edward B. Used under licence.

So what’s the problem then? Since Apple opened up the iPhone to third party developers we have seen a heap of applications that connect you to your online services – there are apps that let you upload photos to Flickr, post to Twitter, see what’s going on in Facebook land all sorts of stuff. The problem is the way some of them are gaining access to these services by making you enter your credentials in the applications rather than seeking to authorise the application from the service.

Probably the best way to explain what I mean is to look at how it should work. The Pownce app is an example of doing it right as is Mobile Foto – these applications rely on OAuth. This is how it works: rather than entering your user-name and password in the application you are sent over to Safari to log into the website and from there you authorise (via OAuth) the application to do its thing.

This might not sound so great – you could argue that the user experience would be better if you were kept within the application. But that would mean that your login credentials would need to be stored on your ‘phone, and that means that you need to disclose those credentials to a third party (the folks that wrote the app).

By using OAuth you log into Flickr, Pownce etc. and from there authorise the application to user the site – your credentials are kept safe and if your iPhone gets stolen you can visit the site and disable access. Everything is where it should be and that means your login details are safe.

To be fair to the iPhone app developers this type of delegated authorisation isn’t always possible. Twitter, for example, still hasn’t implement OAuth and as a result if you want to use one of the growing number of iPhone Twitter app you need to give up your user-name and password. I find this incredible frustrating – especially from a service like Twitter where (according to Biz Stone, Twitter’s co-founder) “the API… has easily 10 times more traffic than the website“.

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